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CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES
AWARDS AND SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES

 

 


a

Boy Scout World Conservation Award Patch

Boy Scout World Conservation Award

The World Conservation Award is worn on the uniform shirt, centered on the right pocket as a TEMPORARY patch. Only ONE Temporary patch may be worn at a time.

The World Conservation Award provides an opportunity for individual Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers to "think globally" and "act locally" to preserve and improve our environment. This program is designed to make youth members aware that all nations are closely related through natural resources and that we are interdependent with our world environment.

As a Boy Scout, you can earn this award by earning the following merit badges:

  1. Environmental Science merit badge.
  2. Soil and Water Conservation or
    Fish and Wildlife Management merit badge.
  3. Citizenship in the World merit badge.

 


b

Cub Scout World Conservation Award  

This Award is meant for Cub Scouts.
Decide for yourself if it is appropriate for your younger scouts or not.

The World Conservation Award provides an opportunity for individual Cub Scouts to 'think globally' and 'act locally' to preserve and improve our environment. This program is designed to make youth members aware that all nations are closely related through natural resources and that we are interdependent with our world environment.

The Cub Scout version of the World Conservation Award can be earned by Wolf, Bear, or Webelos Scouts, but not by Tigers.

This is considered a 'temporary patch' and should be displayed centered on the right pocket. It can be sewn on or displayed in a plastic patch holder hung from the pocket button.

This award can be earned only once while you are in Cub Scouting
(i.e. as either a Wolf, Bear, or Webelos Scout).

As a Wolf Cub Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Complete achievement #7 - Your Living World
  • Complete all Arrow Points in 2 of the following 3 Electives:
    • #13 - Birds
    • #15 - Grow Something
    • #19 - Fishing
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above

As a Bear Cub Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Complete achievement #5 - Sharing Your World with Wildlife
  • Complete all requirements in 2 of the following 3 electives:
    • #2 - Weather
    • #12 - Nature Crafts
    • #15 - Water and Soil Conservation
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project in addition to the above.

As a Webelos Scout, earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award by doing the following:

  • Earn the Forester activity badge.
  • Earn the Naturalist activity badge.
  • Earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
  • Participate in a den or pack conservation project.

 


c

Leave No Trace Boy Scout Award

This Award is meant for Boy Scouts.
Decide for yourself if it is appropriate for your younger scouts or not.

Leave No Trace is a plan that helps people to be more concerned about their environment and to help them protect it for future generations. Leave No Trace applies in a backyard or local park (frontcountry) as much as it does in the wilderness (backcountry).

Leave No Trace is an awareness and an attitude rather than a set of rules. We should practice Leave No Trace in our attitude and actions wherever we go.

Leave No Trace Backcountry Guidelines

  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  3. Dispose of Waste Properly
  4. Leave What You Find
  5. Minimize Campfire Impacts
  6. Respect Wildlife
  7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors

Scout Award Requirements:

  1. Recite and explain the principles of Leave No Trace.
  2. On three separate camping/backpacking trips demonstrate and practice the principles of Leave No Trace.
  3. Earn the Camping and Environmental Science merit badges, OR share with a Scouter your understanding and knowledge of the Camping and Environmental Science merit badge pamphlets.
  4. Participate in a Leave No Trace related service project.
  5. Give a 10-minute presentation on a Leave No Trace topic approved by your Scoutmaster.
  6. Draw a poster or build a model to demonstrate the differences in how we camp or travel in high-use and pristine areas.

Adult Award Requirements:

  1. Recite and explain the principles of Leave No Trace.
  2. On three separate camping/backpacking trips demonstrate and practice the principles of Leave No Trace.
  3. Share with another Scouter or Venturing leader your understanding and knowledge of the Camping and Environmental Science merit badge pamphlets.
  4. Actively assist (training, advice, and general supervision) a Scout in planning, organizing, and leading a service project related to Leave No Trace.
  5. Assist a minimum of three Scouts in earning the Leave No Trace Awareness Award.
  6. Plan and conduct a Leave No Trace awareness for Scouts, Venturers, Scouters, or an interested group outside Scouting.
  7. The award patch is a 'temporary' patch and should be displayed centered on the right pocket, either sewn or hanging from the pocket button.

 

 


d

Leave No Trace Cub Scout Award

 

This Award is meant for Cub Scouts.
Decide for yourself if it is appropriate for your younger scouts or not.

Leave No Trace is a plan that helps people to be more concerned about their environment and to help them protect it for future generations. Leave No Trace applies in a backyard or local park (frontcountry) as much as it does in the wilderness (backcountry).

We should practice Leave No Trace in our attitude and actions wherever we go. Understanding nature strengthens our respect toward the environment.

When boys and leaders complete the requirements they may purchase a Cub Scout Leave No Trace temporary patch (No. 08797). Both the publication and patch are available through local councils.

Leave No Trace Frontcountry Guidelines

  1. Plan ahead
  2. Stick to trails
  3. Manage your pet
  4. Leave what you find
  5. Respect other visitors
  6. Trash your trash

Award Requirements:

  1. Discuss with your leader or parent/guardian the importance of the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
  2. On three separate outings, practice the frontcountry guidelines of Leave No Trace.
  3. Boys in a Tiger Cub den complete the activities for Achievement 5, Let's Go Outdoors; boys in a Wolf den complete Requirement 7, Your Living World; boys in a Bear den complete Requirement 12, Family Outdoor Adventures; boys in a Webelos den earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
     
  4. Participate in a Leave No Trace - related service project.
  5. Promise to practice the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines by signing the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge.
  6. Draw a poster to illustrate the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines and display it at a pack meeting.

 

 


e

Boy Scout Conservation
Good Turn Award

This Award is meant for Boy Scouts.
Decide for yourself if it is appropriate for your younger scouts or not.

Conservation has always been an integral part of the program of the Boy Scouts of America. Scouts have rendered distinguished public service by helping to conserve wildlife, energy, forests, soil, and water. Past generations of Scouts have been widely recognized for undertaking conservation Good Turn action projects in their local communities.

The Conservation Good Turn is an opportunity for Boy Scout troops to join with conservation or environmental organizations (federal, state, local, or private) to carry out a conservation Good Turn in their home communities. Working together in the local community, the unit and the agency plan the details and establish the date, time and location for carrying out the project.

Conservation projects should involve the entire troop - scouts, leaders, and family members. Hands-on projects help Boy Scouts realize that everyone can do things to care for the environment. Scouts participating in the Conservation Good Turn can also meet some advancement requirements.

Agencies to contact for project ideas:

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • U.S. Forest Service
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • National Park Service
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • local City Works department
  • Audobon Society
  • Trout Unlimited

    Some suggested projects could be:

    • Plant shrubs to provide food and cover for wildlife.
    • Conduct stream improvement projects to prevent erosion.
    • Plant tree seedlings as part of a managed forestry plan.
    • Assist a local agency with a trout stream restoration project.
    • Develop a nature trail in a public park.



    The patch can be worn as a temporary insignia.

 

f


Cub Scout Conservation
Good Turn Award

 

This Award is meant for Cub Scouts.
Decide for yourself if it is appropriate for your younger scouts or not.

Conservation has always been an integral part of the program of the Boy Scouts of America. Scouts have rendered distinguished public service by helping to conserve wildlife, energy, forests, soil, and water. Past generations of Scouts have been widely recognized for undertaking conservation Good Turn action projects in their local communities.

The Conservation Good Turn is an opportunity for Cub Scout packs to join with conservation or environmental organizations (federal, state, local, or private) to carry out a conservation Good Turn in their home communities. Working together in the local community, the unit and the agency plan the details and establish the date, time and location for carrying out the project.

Conservation projects should involve the entire Cub Scout pack - scouts, leaders, and family members. Hands-on projects help Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts realize that everyone can do things to care for the environment. Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts participating in the Conservation Good Turn can also meet some advancement requirements.

Agencies to contact for project ideas:

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • U.S. Forest Service
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • National Park Service
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • local City Works department
  • Audobon Society
  • Trout Unlimited

    Some suggested projects could be:

    • Plant grasses, trees, shrubs, and ground cover to stop soil erosion.
    • As a den or pack, adopt a park and keep it clean.
    • Organize or participate in a recycling program.
    • Participate in a beach or waterfront cleanup. Record the items collected and determine the possible harmful effects to wildlife.
    • Establish a nature trail, plant vegetation, or carry out other needed projects as requested by the camp ranger at a local BSA camp property.



    The patch can be worn as a temporary insignia or on the scout's patch vest.


g


Heroes of Conservation

 

In September 2005, Field & Stream, the world's leading outdoor magazine, featured an article titled "Heroes of Conservation" that focused on local conservation efforts being led by extraordinatry outdoorsmen. Out of this editorial platform, a new program, crated to recognize sportsment dedicated to the protection of fish and wildlife, was launched in the October 2005 issue.

"This is a great opportunity to recognize conservationists in your area," says Field & Stream editor-in-chief Sid Evans. "From the guy down the street who has been quietly removing trash from a trout stream for twenty years to someone building duck habitat, no project is too small. We're honoring these outdoorsmen for actively preserving our heritage and letting them know their efforts have not gone unnoticed."

At Field & Stream, conservation has been a core value for more than 100 years. We are thrilled to be able to extend our Heroes of Conservation program to include the Boy Scouts of America and to draw national attention to what the Boy Scouts are also doing to promote conservation.

In 2007, Field & Stream will create an all new division of the Heroes of Conservation program exclusively for the Boy Scouts. The prize category will be awarded to a single Boy Scout Troop that is actively working on a grassroots conser­vation project. It can be as simple as cleaning up garbage from the local trout stream or planting habitat for a native upland gamebird.

For more information look here:
Heroes of Conservation